Category Archives: Everything else

How to write a great first message

40045870402_f227993815_cThere are two things that make a good first message: finding common ground with a girl, then starting a conversation about it.

The key – and the best way to start a conversation – is to ask a question.

Girls love when you ask them questions.  It’s flattering that you care what they think, and they like talking about themselves.

But it can also be more complicated than that.  Online dating is a little like gaming. Writing a message and getting a girl to reply is the final battle with the boss.  In order to win, you’ll need all the knowledge, strength, and skill you’ve acquired so far.

Here’s how to level up with your first message:

1. Focus on quality, not quantity.  Unfortunately, many guys try to message a bunch of girls, instead of just the ones who are the best matches.  They don’t take time to write good messages. They’d rather write a lot of messages – and take any response they can get, whether or not the girl is a good fit for him. Girls see through this.  They get so many of those lazy mass-messages that they just ignore them.

If you spend a little more time messaging girls who are a good match for you, you’ll probably find it’s much more productive.  Look for girls with common interests, shared beliefs, and similar goals. Those girls are much more likely to respond to you because you are a good fit.

And a girl like that will appreciate that you took the time to read her profile, notice what you have in common, and ask her questions about those things, creating a solid connection.

2. Compliment common interests and personality – not looks. Girls are tired of getting messages from guys who compliment our looks, but have nothing to say about the rest of our profiles. Those messages are shallow and meaningless.

You’re not one of those guys, and you have to show that.  The best first messages show girls that you’re interested in who they are – not what they look like.

3. Start a conversation. So many guys don’t know HOW to do this!  They ask really general questions, like, “How’s your weekend going?” or “What’s up?” These messages are the worst. While “How are you?” is a question, it doesn’t actually start a conversation.  A girl can reply, “Good. How are you?” but then we’re back where we started. Pointless.  

If you read a girl’s profile and can’t think of a question to ask her based on the information there, don’t message her at all.

A great first message jumps past pointless questions and right into specific questions.  The best questions you can ask have “long-game.” That’s why it works so well to ask a girl about something you have in common.  When you bring up a topic you both like, you’ll both have lots to say about it, which paves the way for a longer conversation.

For example: say you and a girl are both snowboarders.  You could easily lead by asking her the question: “Where’s your favorite spot to snowboard around here?”  After she answers that, you’re probably also interested in asking how long she’s been snowboarding, what gear she likes, and if she has any upcoming trips planned.

Because you opened with a topic she’s interested in, too, she’ll probably ask you those questions back – plus more of her own. That’s a lot to talk about, and that’s long-game. To achieve this, you have to ask her questions.  The questions are the gas. Making a statement, like, “I like snowboarding, too,” doesn’t move the conversation forward.

4. Keep it simple.  As a rule of thumb, ask one or two questions.  Some guys make the mistake of firing off a long list of questions about a whole range of topics.  This is overwhelming to girls. And it’s time-consuming to answer ten questions!

Stick with one or two low-pressure questions that make it easy for us to respond quickly because we’re interested.  Online dating is awesome because a girl’s profile is one big list of conversation topics. Just pick one detail you think is cool, or you’re genuinely curious about, and ask her about it.   

Extra tip: Don’t answer your own questions.  When you ask the question and don’t including your own answer, then my next logical step will be to ask you the same question back.

5. Keep it short. Your first message should make a simple introduction, express your interest in her profile, ask one or two long-game questions about things you share in common, and then simply sign-off with your name.  A couple lines, or a paragraph or two is great. When guys write a lot more, they come on too strong.  

Leave girls wanting more.  With your first message, your goal is to make girls want to continue talking to you.  When we see you’re the kind of guy who makes an effort in a first message, but knows not to go overboard, we’ll be impressed.

Effort + confidence = a guy worth knowing.

6. Re-read what you wrote.  Look for spelling and grammatical errors.  It’ll only take a minute, and you’ll probably notice at least one typo that can be corrected.

And send.
Source: Menaskem

15 things not to do in Russia

woman-hand-leave-wall-glass-refrain-from-no-not(1)Whenever you’re traveling to a new destination, it’s important to research local customs before you go. Russia is no exception, especially because the local people tend to be very superstitious and you wouldn’t want to do anything that signifies bad luck. Here are 15 things NOT to do in Russia, the most important – don’t refuse vodka!

1. Don’t shake hands with your gloves on unless you want to insult the person you’re meeting

It is considered extremely impolite to leave your gloves on while greeting someone with a handshake. So make sure you remove your gloves before any interaction occurs. Also, never shake hands over a threshold as Russians see this as bad luck. They’ll expect an argument to be the outcome of your conversation if you shake hands in a doorway.

2. Don’t take the “last shirt” unless you’re really, truly in need

Russians have a funny phrase which translates roughly in English to “Do not take back the last t-shirt.” It simply means never be the one to take the last, and always give back. Therefore, Russians tend to be very generous even if they don’t have much to give. So never accept a gift unless you truly want it. You may be required to refuse it several times.

3. Whatever you do, never, ever tell a joke about a Russian person’s mama

Many jokes you’ll hear in Russia will not be considered politically correct as gender, race, religion and politics-based laughs are not off limits. However, never make fun of someone else’s family member as this is seen as very disrespectful and insulting.

4. Don’t disrespect the elderly unless you want to invoke the wrath of several much younger, much stronger people

Like with many countries, respecting the elderly is an important part of the family culture. Giving up your seat on a bus or a train for an elderly person or pregnant woman is a sign of respect. In certain countries, some may be offended by this privilege, but in Russia it is expected to offer your seat to someone in need.

5. If you invite someone out to eat, don’t expect them to pick up their half of the tab

When dining out, the host is expected to pay the entire bill, as going “Dutch” is considered rude. Also, the tradition of a man covering all expenses when with a female companion is definitely still upheld in Russia.

6. Don’t ever give a gift of an empty wallet … That’s actually just a good life rule

Russians believe that giving a gift of an empty wallet or purse is bad luck. They see it as wishing financial hardship or poverty on the receiver of the gift. So, make sure you put a little something special inside if you’re giving a lover or friend a new money holder.

7. Don’t expect a lady to carry her bags, which is another good life rule while we’re at it

In Russia, distinct gender roles still exist. Men are expected to act chivalrously – offering a hand to woman getting off of a bus, opening car doors, assisting with heavy lifting. But it has nothing to do with a lack of feminism in the country. Their women are strong, but most Russian men just believe that lending a hand is a simple act of politeness.

8. The Russians reserve happiness for important things, so don’t smile without a reason

Russians reserve smiling for their friends and family members. So don’t randomly smile at strangers while you’re riding on public transportation or shopping in Moscow. Russians have a saying, “To smile with no reason, is a sign of a fool.”

9. Don’t show up empty handed

If you’re invited over to someone’s house for a dinner or a visit, it is considered very rude to show up empty handed. Bring a small gift – a bottle of wine, flowers, dessert or small toy for the children. Russians take pride in preparing elaborate meals for their guests and showing up without a small token of appreciation is a sign that you don’t care.

10. Get comfortable, grab a drink, and don’t leave your shoes on

Whenever entering a Russian home it is proper custom to remove your shoes. Many homes are decorated with expensive Persian rugs that are difficult to clean. Some hosts may offer tapochki (slippers) for you to put on. At nice parties, some women may bring an extra pair of heels or shoes for inside use.

11. Don’t sit at the corner of the table unless you want to live an existence doomed to utter loneliness

This is another Russian superstition. It is advised that you never sit at the corner of the dining table, especially if you’re a young woman. It is said that “the one who chooses a seat at the corner of a table is destined to never be married or find their lover.”

12. Don’t whistle indoors unless you want to invite disaster into your life

Like many Asian cultures, whistling indoors in Russia is considered bad luck. Russians are very superstitious and believe that whistling inside may cause financial ruin, poverty, or another invasion of cockroaches.

13. Get ready to cowboy up when you enter a home; don’t refuse a shot

It is true that many Russians can drink, but not all Russians are heavy drinkers. Most keep one bottle of vodka in their homes at all times for celebrations and random visitors. If you’re offered a shot of vodka don’t refuse it, because sharing a drink is considered a sign of hospitality. Russians don’t see one shot as a big deal, so to them a refusal comes off as untrusting or turning down friendship.

14. Don’t keep empty bottles on the table

If you’re drinking in a Russian home, leaving an empty liquor bottle on the table is considered to be bad luck. Once the bottle has been drunk, it is best to put it on the floor or throw it out before the next bottle is served. It’s also recommended that you keep your change and keys off the table as well. These are all bad omens of financial loss and tears.

15. This isn’t Denny’s on a Sunday morning, so don’t slack in the style department

Russians dress very well. Men and women alike love to dress up even for informal occasions like grocery shopping or going to the bank. You’ll hardly ever see a Russian woman on the street without a full set of makeup and sky-high heels. So, the next time you’re in Russia, up your style standards.

Source: Destinationtips

International Women’s Day in Russia

petal-bloomed-blooming-flowerInternational Women’s Day in Russia honors women’s achievements on March 8 each year.

What do people do?

International Women’s Day is often celebrated among family or friends with a festive meal and drinks. Many women receive flowers, cards and other gifts on March 8. Many television programs pay tribute to achievements of famous Russian women from the past and the present.

Public life

International Women’s Day is a public holiday in Russia on March 8. Most banks, official buildings and educational institutions are closed on this day, although shops and kiosks usually stay open. Public transport may run less frequently than usual.

Background

Russian women first observed International Women’s Day on March 2, 1913. They held a demonstration in Saint-Petersburg, which was then Russia’s capital, demanding the right to vote. On March 8, 1917 (February 23, 1917 of the then used Julian calendar), women organized another mass demonstration. Many historians believe this became the start of the Russian Revolution. The Russian Emperor Nicholas II stepped down from the throne four days after the demonstration, and the provisional government granted Russian women the right to vote.

International Women’s Day has been a national holiday in Russia since 1918. It became a non-labor day in 1965. International Women’s Day remained a public holiday in the Russia after the collapse of the former Soviet Union. Today it is a holiday to honor motherhood, beauty, and spring. International Women’s Day is also celebrated in other countries around the world.

Symbols

Spring flowers, especially tulips and lilies of the valley, and images of a mother with a child are the most common symbols of International Women’s Day in Russia. These symbols often appear on postcards that men traditionally give women on March 8.

International Women’s Day vocabulary

С 8 Марта – Happy March 8th

Поздравляю с 8 Марта - Wishing you a Happy March 8th

Поздравляю с Международным Женским Днём! – Wishing you a happy International Women’s Day!

Source: Time and Date

Defender of the Fatherland Day in Russia

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Defender of the Fatherland Day is a Russian holiday on February 23 and focuses on the achievements of military forces and veterans.

What do people do?

Many Russians observe February 23 as men’s day because military service is obligatory for most men in Russia. Women often give presents and postcards to their male relatives, including those who never served in the military. On a workday before or after the holiday, many women also congratulate their male colleagues and schoolboys may receive small presents from their female classmates.

Russian authorities may organize local parades to honor the military and veterans on this day. It is becoming more common for women who serve in the military to be honored on this day, and this challenges the traditionally masculine aspect of the holiday.

Public life

Defender of the Fatherland Day, which is on February 23, is a public holiday throughout the Russian Federation. Most schools, banks and official buildings are closed on this day. Public transport services may vary in cities that hold a parade.

Background

The reasons behind celebrating Defender of the Fatherland Day on February 23 are unclear, as the date does not coincide with any historical event. Russia first celebrated this day in 1922 as the fourth anniversary of the Red Army. However, Russian leader Vladimir Lenin signed a decree for the creation of a Bolshevik Army on a different date (January 15, 1918). In 1938, Soviet history books started claiming that the Red Army won an important victory over German invaders on February 23, 1918, but no independent sources supported this claim. The Russian Parliament voted to remove it from the holiday’s history in 2006.

Between 1936 and 1990, February 23 was observed as the Soviet Army and Navy Day. It became a workday in 1991. The Russian parliament reintroduced it as a public holiday in 2002, after renaming it as Defender of the Fatherland Day.

Symbols

Common symbols of Defender of the Fatherland Day are a soldier and the Russian flag. These symbols often appear on postcards and congratulatory banners in Russian cities on this day.

Source: Time and Date

Valentine’s day in Russia

love-heart-valentines-valentines-day-redRussians celebrate Valentine’s Day with high spirit and vigor. People exchange greeting cards with love messages on this day of love. It is believed that greeting cards are the expressions of love. Russian youngsters use to write their own romantic lines on the cards to impress their valentine. Roses, chocolates, candies and cards are believed to be the most popular gifts for the romantic occasion. Russia is celebrating the Valentine’s Day with the same spirit with which they celebrate their traditional festivals.

The day of love is getting very popular in Russia in the last decades. Valentine’s Day is getting much commercialized in Russia, from the past decade. Some gift shops in Russia use to paint themselves with the festive look of Valentine’s Day long before the arrival of the real Valentine’s event. Gift basket is a common practice between lovers in Russia on Valentine’s Day. Russian Young men gifts flower bouquets, rings, perfumes, chocolate candies and gift baskets to their sweethearts. Nowadays, teenagers are very much fascinated by the popular media’s projection of Valentine’s gifts and they enjoy the day with new ideas such as photo story albums, musical CDs, DVDs, High-Fi mobile phones.

Russia being one of the most developed countries, urban people are very familiar with the electronic media and its possibilities. So people from different cities the valentine greetings with e-cards and gifts which available through online Valentine’s Day shopping sites. Valentine’s Day dinner and dance parties take place in Russian cities to celebrate the expression of love. Most of these parties are arranged by the youngsters who want to explore the spirit of their youth. Restaurant and pubs get prepared for the Valentine’s Day with finely tuned cocktails and live music. Russia celebrates the Valentine’s Day with true spirit of Valentine’s day but they never get into the insanity of celebration because most of Russian villages think of Valentine’s day as a foreign festival.

Source: Everything Valentines Day

Christmas traditions in Russia

christmas-bokeh-lightsChristmas in Russia is most widely celebrated on January 7, according to the Russian Orthodox calendar. New Year’s Day, January 1, precedes the Russian Christmas and is often celebrated as a more important holiday. It is not uncommon for Russians to observe two Christmases and even two New Year’s—the first Christmas observed on December 25th, and the second New Year’s observed on January 14th. Any public trees, like the Christmas tree in Moscow’s Red Square, also serve as a symbol of the New Year.

Russian Christmas Religious Observances

During much of the 20th century as a Communist, atheist country, Christmas was not able to be publicly celebrated. Currently, many Russians continue to identify themselves as atheists, so the religious observance of Christmas had faded out of fashion. Increasingly, since the fall of Communism, Russians are returning to religion, primarily Russian Orthodoxy. The number of people celebrating Christmas as a religious holiday continues to grow.

Some Orthodox Christian Christmas traditions mimic those traditions in other parts of Eastern Europe. For example, a white tablecloth and hay remind Christmas Eve diners of Christ’s manger. As in Poland, a meatless meal may be prepared for Christmas Eve, which is eaten only after the appearance of the first star in the sky.

A Christmas church service, which happens the night of Christmas Eve, is attended by members of the Orthodox church.

Even the President of Russia has begun attending these solemn, beautiful services in Moscow.

Christmas Foods

The Christmas Eve meal is typically meatless and may be made up of twelve dishes to represent the twelve apostles. Lenten bread, dipped in honey and garlic, is shared by all members of the family gathering.       

Kutya is a concoction of grains and poppy seeds sweetened with honey, which serves as one of the main dishes of the Christmas feast. Vegetarian-style borsch or solyanka, a salty stew, may also be served along with salads, sauerkraut, dried fruit, potatoes, and beans.

The Christmas day meal may feature a main course of pork, goose, or other meat dish and will be accompanied by a variety of side dishes such as aspic, stuffed pies, and desserts in various forms.

The Russian Santa Claus

The Russian Santa Claus is named Ded Moroz, or Father Frost. Accompanied by Snegurochka, the snow maiden, he brings presents to children to place under the New Year’s tree. He carries a staff, wears valenki , or felt boots, and is carried across Russia in a troika, or a vehicle led by three horses,instead of a sleigh pulled by reindeer.

Russian Christmastide

Svyatki, which is Russian Christmastide, follows the celebration of Christmas and lasts until January 19, the day Epiphany is celebrated. This two-week period is closely associated with pagan traditions of fortune telling and caroling.

Source: TripSavvy

13 amazing online dating statistics and facts

woman-typing-writing-macbook-notebook-computerToday, there are millions of people on thousands of dating sites looking for their perfect match, whether that’s for a date, relationship, or marriage. With this growing industry comes a lot of information that’s worth knowing. Here is a list of 13 good, bad, and just plain weird statistics on online dating that will blow your mind.

1. 49 million people have tried online dating

With about 49 million singles having dabbled in online dating at least once, a majority of us are probably among that statistic or know somebody who is. As is typical with most new inventions, some were skeptical when dating sites first came out, but they’ve clearly become one of the preferred ways to find love.

2. Online dating is a good way to meet others, say 59% of people

In 2015, the Pew Research Center found over half of men and women believe online dating is a great venue for meeting people. And we’d have to agree — you have tons of options to choose from and can cater the process to your wants.

3. 66% of users have dated someone they met online

Not only is online dating extremely popular, as evidenced by the stats above, but it also truly works. That same Pew Research Center study said two-thirds of online daters have gone out with someone with whom they were matched. Those seem like pretty decent odds to us.

4. One-fifth of committed relationships began online

If a serious relationship is what you’re looking for, you might want to turn to online dating to find it. Statistic Brain says 20% of current committed relationships started online.

5. 17% of marriages started online

Statistic Brain’s research also shows 17% of couples who married within the last year met on a dating website.

With online dating, you get very specific about your needs (e.g., marriage), which makes it quick and simple to find that special someone who can meet those needs.

6. Lion’s share (27%) of online daters are 18-24

According to Pew, those between 18 and 24 make up the largest demographic of online daters in terms of age. In comparison, 22% are 25 to 34; 21% are 35 to 44; 13% are 45 to 54; 12% are 55 to 64, and 3% are 65+.

7. The online dating gender ratio is 52.4% male vs. 47.6% female

While numerous dating sites lean slightly more female with their gender ratio (e.g., Match 51% vs. 49%), online dating tends to attract more males as a whole: 52.4% compared to 47.6%. This was another fact discovered by Statistic Brain.

8. What’s more important? 64% say shared interest, 49% say looks

Referencing Statistic Brain again, the site found almost two-thirds of people who use online dating say the number one thing they’re looking for in a date or partner is common interests, while less than half say physical characteristics are the most important to them.

9. 22% of people have asked someone to help with their profile

Your profile is the first thing singles will see on a dating site, and to be honest, most of them will only take a few seconds to read it and determine if you’re right for them or not. That puts a lot of pressure on people to make their profiles perfect, especially those who are trying online dating for the first time and aren’t the best writers. So it’s understandable that almost one-fourth of online daters have asked someone to give them a hand with this part of the process such as choosing the best photos or tweaking some of the language.

10. 23% of people think those who use online dating are desperate

We mentioned earlier that 59% of people think online dating is a fantastic way to meet others, but there are some skeptics out there. According to Pew’s poll, 23% think those who date online are desperate. However, that number has gone down a good bit. In 2005, it was 29%, so more people are starting to look at online dating in a positive light.

11. More than half lie on their dating profile

Singles want to put their best foot forward online — some so much so that some of them won’t be as forthcoming about themselves as they should be. Phactual.com says more than half of users fabricate some or all of their dating profile. For example, 20% of women will use photos from when they were younger, while 40% of men will lie about their jobs.

12. 48% of online relationships end via email

There are a lot of online dating success statistics out there, but you’re bound to come across some bad ones every now and then. One of them is from an infographic by eHarmony that shows 48% of relationships that began online will end with someone breaking up with their partner via email.

13. 10% of online daters quit after three months

While we love online dating and think it’s one of the best inventions to come out of the 20th century, we’ll admit that it can be frustrating for some people from time to time — especially if they’ve been doing it for weeks or months and haven’t met that perfect person yet. In fact, one out of every 10 online daters will give up after 90 days, as reported by Statistic Brain.

Source: DatingAdvice

Use humour to become more successful in online dating

smiling-woman-working-on-computer

If you ask someone to list the characteristics they require in a potential dating partner, it is likely that they would say they want someone with a good sense of humour.  Humour may be especially important in online interactions because after the initial impression given by a person’s profile picture, it is what a person says and how they describe themselves which takes over and becomes more salient.  

Humour puts people in a good and positive mood.  In an initial encounter with someone, our mood is a crucial factor in determining attraction.  If we experience positive feelings, this subsequently leads to a positive evaluation of the other person.

In a study by Bressler, Martin & Balshine participants were asked to think of the following.  Imagine a situation where you are choosing between two potential dating partners. They are equally physically attractive, intelligent, interesting, friendly and compassionate.  The only difference between them is in the following.

  • One is great at making you laugh and you think they are very funny. However, they don’t laugh all that much when you make jokes.  They listen to you, but when you make jokes you rarely get more than a smile from them.  
  • The other laughs at all your jokes and think you are a very funny person, but you don’t find their jokes very funny.  You understand their jokes and don’t find them offensive, but they rarely make you laugh.

Bressler et al reported that males prefer females who are receptive to their humour and laugh at their jokes, whereas females value humour production in a relationship partner!

Females in relationships with more humorous partners rated them as being more creative and intelligent, and also as being more popular and better leaders. Males who construct humorous profiles and engage in online messaging using humour might attract more females. 

Having a good sense of humour suggests that we can interact easily with others and that we possess a relaxed and fun-loving personality, all of which make us more attractive.

Source: Psychology Today

March 8: International Women’s Day

flowers-flowers-bouquet-springingMarch 8th is nearly here! Do you have big celebration plans yet? If not, it’s time to think about how you would like to surprise your favorite women: Moms, sisters, wives, daughters, girlfriends, co-workers. If you didn’t know yet, March 8th is the International Women’s Day and it is widely celebrated in Russian speaking countries.

History of the International Women’s Day

Interestingly, the holiday originated in New York in 1908 when women went on a strike to demand equal rights, voting rights, shorter hours and better pay.

In Russia International Women’s Day was celebrated in 1913 first time as a part of the peace movement on the eve of World War I. Soon, following the events of 1913, it was established that the International Women’s Day will be celebrated on March 8th.

How is International Women’s Day celebrated in Russia today?

Today, International Women’s Day is one of the favorite public holidays in Russia. This day is associated with the first days of spring, warmth, first sunny rays and the most wonderful emotions. On March 8th men and women express their love and care to the women in their lives.

When it comes to gifts, it’s more about the gesture. It is not a secret, that women like attention, and even a small thing like a card, flowers and a box of chocolates will put a smile on your lady’s face. And of course, it also depends on how well you know each other: whether you are coworkers, relatives, are dating and so on. Now, let’s skip to the fun stuff – a few words and expressions in Russian that you might need when celebrating the International Women’s Day.

International Women’s Day in Russia vocabulary

С 8 Марта – Happy March 8th

Поздравляю с 8 Марта - Wishing you a Happy March 8th

Поздравляю с Международным Женским Днём! – Wishing you a happy International Women’s Day!

Source: Fun Russian

Valentine’s Day celebration in Russia and Ukraine

young-smiling-couple-posing-with-red-heart-on-white-background

Valentine’s Day is coming up! Each year on February 14th, many people exchange cards, candy, gifts or flowers with their special “valentine.” In Russia and Ukraine Valentine’s Day is a relatively new, but one of the most popular romantic holidays.

What Gifts are Popular in Russia and Ukraine on Valentine’s Day?

Valentine’s Day in Russia and Ukraine is all about expressing your love and care to your significant other. This means that you can get as creative as you like when it comes to gifts. Any gift that conveys romantic feelings will be very well received. For example, a little memorable souvenir, such as a framed picture of you both having fun, or a poem written for your significant other will make a perfect Valentine’s Day gift.

Giving flowers is considered one of the most romantic gestures in Russia. Russian and Ukrainian women love flowers! A bunch of fresh roses, tulips, orchids or any other flowers will certainly bring a smile to her face. If your lady has a sweet tooth she will most definitely like a box of chocolates.

How Do Russians Celebrate Valentine’s Day?

There are no specific Russian/Ukrainian traditions associated with this holiday. Just remember to let your imagination go and make your celebration as romantic and as memorable as you like. Russians love romance. These are just a few suggestions to warm up your imagination:

• Enjoy a homemade candle lit dinner with a glass of good wine

• Cuddle up watching an old romantic movie (preferably in Russian – so you can practice your Russian language skills )

• Go for a romantic walk in the park, or a beach holding hands and sharing your childhood stories

• Reserve a table at a fancy restaurant and surprise your sweetheart

• Write romantic letters to each other

Valentine’s Day Was Banned in Belgorod

Unfortunately, not every city in Russia welcomes Valentine’s Day. Belgorod, a small city in western Russia banned Valentine’s Day a couple of years ago.

Grigory Bolotnov, a spokesman for the governor’s office, stated that celebrating Valentine’s Day is not a Russian tradition and it does not teach good moral values to Russian youth. Belgorod archbishop supported governor’s decision to cancel the holiday.

How to Wish Happy Valentine’s Day in Russian

It might be a great idea for you to wish a Happy Valentine’s Day to your Russian or Ukrainian woman. Here is how to write it in Russian:

С Днём Святого Валентина! [s DNYOM svya-TO-va va-lyen-TEE-na] Happy Valentine’s Day!

Have a Happy Valentine’s Day – only with your loved ones!

Source: Fun Russian